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Global summit in Switzerland urges end to Russian aggression in Ukraine

16.06.2024 15:15
At a Swiss summit attended by representatives from over 90 countries, a communique calling for an end to Russia’s war in Ukraine was issued on Sunday.
(L-R) European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, Swiss Federal President Viola Amherd, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Chiles President Gabriel Boric and Canadas Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attend the closing press conference of the Summit on Peace in Ukraine in Stansstad near Lucerne, Switzerland, 16 June 2024. International h
(L-R) European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, Swiss Federal President Viola Amherd, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Chile's President Gabriel Boric and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attend the closing press conference of the Summit on Peace in Ukraine in Stansstad near Lucerne, Switzerland, 16 June 2024. International hPhoto: EPA/URS FLUEELER

The 'Summit on Peace in Ukraine', held at the request of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, highlighted the severe human suffering and destruction caused by the conflict, emphasizing the need for a collective path to peace.

"The ongoing war of the Russian Federation against Ukraine continues to cause large-scale human suffering and destruction, and to create risks and crises with global repercussions," the declaration reads.

The joint statement asserts that nuclear installations in Ukraine must be protected, while shipping routes and ports need to be safeguarded.

Also, it calls for the release of all prisoners and the return of Ukrainian children abducted by Russia.

While the communique received widespread support, notable absentees in endorsing the document included Saudi Arabia and India, reflecting the complex geopolitical landscape surrounding the conflict, the Reuters news agency reported.

President Zelensky expressed optimism about the summit's outcomes, announcing that participants had agreed to continue working through specialized groups to develop concrete "action plans for peace."

He indicated that these efforts would set the stage for a second summit once detailed plans were formulated.

"We agreed to start working in special after-summit groups on specific ideas, proposals, and developments that can restore security in various aspects," Zelensky said at a joint news conference.

"When the action plans for peace are ready and every step is worked out, the path will be opened for the second peace summit," the Ukrainian head of state added.

Also, following the summit, European Commission Chief Ursula von der Leyen said: "We know that peace in Ukraine will not be achieved in one step, it will be a journey."

"It was not a peace negotiation because (Russia's President) Putin is not serious about ending the war. He’s insisting on capitulation, he’s insisting on ceding Ukrainian territory - even territory that today is not occupied," she said after the talks.

Russia, which was not invited and declined to attend, dismissed the summit as a waste of time and presented its own proposals from afar. China was also notably absent.

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan dismissed a peace proposal from Russian President Vladimir Putin as unreasonable, stating it would leave Kyiv vulnerable to further aggression.

"Not only does Ukraine have to give up the territory that Russia currently occupies, but Ukraine has to leave additional sovereign Ukrainian territory," Sullivan said.

"No responsible nation can say that this is a reasonable basis for peace. It defies the UN Charter, basic morality, and common sense," the US official added.

(ał)

Source: Reuters, IAR